Tag Archives: wildlife

Flying ant day 2015

If you saw mention in the news about swarms of flying ants during the the last week, then you may also have seen the ants themselves. Over the weekend between July 31 and August 2 there were a flurry of stories across all the media reporting sightings of the emergence of thousands of flying ants with Sunday August 2 being the peak ‘Flying Ant Day’. Here at home, in west Oxfordshire, Flying Ant Day was Friday July 31 at approximately 5.15pm. I was lucky enough to see two colonies emerge, with the larger young queens and smaller males to take to the air for their nuptial flight, guided from the nest by small wingless workers. Last year’s Flying Ant Day occurred on July 27 at 7pm and on that occasion it was yellow meadow ants (Lasius flavus) that were seen. They emerged from an old tree stump in the garden.

ants-2

The ants I saw this year were black ants, probably Lasius niger and the ant most likely to be seen in the UK. One emergence came from under the slabs in the courtyard. We had been aware of their presence because of sandy deposits in the gaps between the slabs and because of increased worker ant activity in the days leading up to the nuptial flight. The other emergence was in the garden, where it seems that they were under the walls of the building at the end of the garden. Seeing that white wall suddenly covered in winged ants was quite startling and took me back to the age of about seven, when I’d seen black ants crawling up a white wall at my childhood home. There were hundreds of them slowly making their way up to about 3m before taking off. Some fell off and had to start again, others took off and landed on my clothes before making another attempt at flight. You can see why people having picnics or barbecues might be annoyed by such a phenomenon but I was involved in neither and it was fascinating to watch.

ants

The weather conditions for both this year and last year’s emergence was the same – dry, warm, humid and with a light breeze. This allows the ants to take flight and mate without being blown away or rained on. So many ants flying at once means that they are so many that not all can be predated by birds and there will be enough queens to land, shed their wings and start a new colony. Only the queens survive the nuptial flight, the males die shortly after mating.

If you saw an ant colony emerge and would like to submit your records, you can do so on the website of the Royal Society of Biology, where you can also find out more about the UK’s ant species.

The blackbirds and robins are nesting again

Feeding the birds means that we can easily tell for the first time how many broods they are having and when. The main thing we watch out for is whether the birds eat the offered mealworms or fly away with them and, for both robins and blackbirds, it looks like they are onto their second broods of the season.

robin-blackbird

After the garden robin took over the courtyard robin’s territory in May, he introduced a mate and they started courtship feeding around May 5. This continued until May 29 when it abruptly stopped and both birds started appearing separately, which we understood to mean that the female was no longer sitting on the nest and the first brood of robins had been raised. On June 5, courtship feeding resumed and, as far as we know, is on-going. By ‘as far as we know’ I mean that the robins have endeared themselves to our next door neighbours who, seeing us feeding them, naturally wanted to try it for themselves and so the robins are visiting them as well. With a steady supply of good food, it will be interesting to see how many broods are raised this year.

blackbird-doorstep

There are also two pairs of blackbirds coming to us for mealworms, one pair from the courtyard and the other from the garden. They will occasionally all turn up in the same spot and a chase then ensues, but they mostly stay in their own territories. The courtyard blackbirds are still nesting in the ivy that grows on the wall between us and next door and, the young having fledged, the female gathered more material to refurbish the nest and laid eggs again. Those eggs have hatched and both birds are busily feeding young ones.

blackbird-window-3

The garden blackbird’s territory has come to include our kitchen windowsill, as he has spotted us through the glass and will sometimes perch outside and stare in at us. Sometimes he does this while we’re eating our dinner, which can feel a little awkward, and reminiscent of scenes from Dickens’ Oliver Twist where the boy of the same name asks for ‘some more’ gruel. At least with us, the blackbird will get it.

blackbird-window

The Tawny Owl – Stotfold, Thurnscoe, 1942

After reading of my adventure with checking out the owl’s nest, my friend John Davison sent me this poem which tells of an adventure from his boyhood in 1942, when he was around 13 years old. John and his friends would spend many hours in the fields and woods around Thurnscoe, Hickleton and Hooten Pagnel, out all day long  exploring together in a way that youngsters rarely experience now.

 

JOHN 1954

The Tawny Owl – Stotfold, Thurnscoe, 1942.

So typical of old ash trees, its crown was torn away,
But why and what had caused it, I really could not say,
Very likely putrefaction, or lightning on the prowl,
All I know, there was a hole, wherein dwelt a Tawny Owl.
Scores of pellets, regurgitated, were littered everywhere,
Confirming, absolutely, an owl was nesting there,
Wait here, I ordered Judy, at that moment somewhat rash,
And immediately began to climb that ancient rugged ash.
Staring down on that owl’s nest, I could not believe my eyes,
Five curious chicks glared back at me, all of a different size,
Then suddenly the larger one lunged vengefully at my face,
And I was fortunate to escape in that confined space,
[Quickly I remembered that photographer* and a Tawny Owl,
Which assailed him as to blind him in an incident so foul]
So when the owl attacked me I raised a hand to shield,
And felt the bird brush by me to glide smoothly to the field.
I saw it floating to the ground then quickly thought of Judy,
Who usually was a gentle dog but could be somewhat moody.
If I did not get down in time she could kill that helpless bird,
That in mind I rushed down that tree as if by the devil spurred.
Oh, how dreadfully wrong I was, how misguided was my fear,
My Judy was the victim, the owl seized her by the ear!
She squealed so loud and pitiful, her blood in copious flow,
Speed was then essential to make the needle claws let go.
I placed the owl beneath a bush, as if in a nightmare dream,
Tenderly soothed that bloody ear in fresh water from a stream,
That trauma ended our meanders, no further would we roam,
And I with Judy, and the owl, made our weary way back home.
I kept that Tawny Owl for months until it could strongly fly,
Then returned the bird to Stotfold and waved a fond goodbye !

*Eric Hosking

John Davison 2015

owl pelletA tawny owl’s pellet

 

 

 

 

 

Checking on an owl’s nest – you’ll need armour

In the far corner of Ruth’s orchard, there is an old shed where her late husband stored some of his work materials. It’s become a little run down and there is a large pane of glass missing from the door, but there is something appealing about this old shed in the orchard with long grass and cow parsley growing around it. Ruth’s son had asked about clearing it out, but Ruth had heard movement in there and suspected that a bird was nesting inside,  possibly an owl. She asked me to check and find out.

orchardThe orchard

Intruding on an owl, or any bird, during breeding season isn’t a good idea and I had some misgivings, but said I would check, very quickly, as it would be better than Ruth’s son entering without knowing if there really was an owl. Not without precautions, though, for as soon as she made the request, an image came to mind of a nesting box I’d photographed some years ago. It was a box for owls and on the front of it, in big red capital letters, was the stark warning ‘Goggles must be worn’, probably alluding to the experience of bird photographer Eric Hosking, who lost an eye after being attacked by an angry owl.

gogglesAnd make sure you do, too!

With the image of ‘Goggles must be worn’ flashing in my mind, I wondered how to  approach the shed safely without becoming the target of an owl’s talons. I had on a thick waxed waistcoat and there was a pair of heavier gloves in my bag, but what of my head and face? Inspiration struck and I asked Ruth if she had a compost sieve. She did, so we brushed it off and it became my owl armour, held at an angle in front of my face and over the top of my head.

sieveOwl armour

Thus protected, I crept towards the door with the missing window pane. At around 1.5m from the door, there was a whoosh and a large bird erupted through the window, flew over my head and sped towards some nearby conifers. It was a Tawny owl (Strix aluco) and its appearance during daylight hours set off alarm calls from every bird in the vicinity. I was expecting something like this, but the experience left me trembling and I returned a little unsteadily to where Ruth was waiting at the edge of the orchard. ‘You have a tawny owl’, I said. ‘Oh good’ she said, ‘Let’s stay away from it and keep it secret’. The location will remain unspoken and no one will be allowed near that shed until August, when the young ones will certainly have fledged and, left in peace, the owl should sort out the garden’s rabbit problem.

Surprising a frog in the dark

When common frogs (Rana temporaria) laid spawn in the tiny garden pond there was also a smooth newt (Lissotriton vulgaris) in the pond and I wondered if the newt would stay and eat the tadpoles. That was at the beginning of April and the tadpoles hatched out a couple of weeks later. It is now the third week in May, the pond is still full of tadpoles and I haven’t seen a newt in the pond for a month. It makes me wonder why the newt hasn’t stayed around to take advantage of the food source, but maybe there are more rewarding ponds nearby.

tadpoles-0518Still there, then

If some of the tadpoles survive to become froglets, they will leave the pond en masse in late summer. The adults, having mated and laid spawn, left the pond some time ago and are in their terrestrial phase. They spend their time hiding in damp and shady locations, coming out at night to find food. I am already finding quite a few frogs and toads in gardens and they hide so well that it is only the movement of foliage, or the predatory glare of someone’s cat, that gives them away. We surprised a frog the other night – seeing friends out late one evening, the automatic light came on and surprised a frog making its way up the garden path. I felt a bit sorry for it suddenly finding itself in the glare of the spotlight so a quick picture was taken and the light hurriedly switched off again, leaving the frog to regain its equilibrium and continue with its business.

nighttime-frogStartled frog, probably not expecting to be the spotlight at midnight

Having downloaded the pictures from the camera, my curiosity got the better of me and I looked more closely for the details that would show whether it was male or female frog. Male frogs are generally a bit smaller than the females and have a lighter coloured throat during the mating season, but one of the main features is that males have thick, rough cushion-like pads on their ‘thumbs’, called ‘nuptial pads‘, which help them to hold onto the female during mating. This frog’s thumbs looked distinctly slender, so I think she is very likely female. Not that it matters for the main thing is that there is at least one frog at work in the courtyard garden.

nighttime-frog-2

Robins come calling

The robin is getting bolder all the time and has begun standing on the window ledge and staring in at us through the window. Sometimes he looks at us from the washing line.

robin-line

This morning we offered mealworms through the open window and he came straight for them.

robin-windowEnlarge the picture and you’ll see the blackbird watching from the path

I know that this could become a bit of a  nuisance when we want to have the windows open, but we’ll see what happens. For now, it’s fascinating to see these birds close up and catch the details that we’d otherwise have missed, such as the whisker-like feathers just in front of the beak.

whiskers

I have one picture, above, where you can just make out these feathers and there is a clearer look at them here.

There is a growing community of species living in the woods

I spent part of a day in the woods by the Rollright Stones simply walking and looking – indulging in the pleasure of quietly observing, identifying, analysing and categorising what I saw. It is all too easy to pass by without actually seeing what is around us and many signs are missed, but look closer, pay attention, and you can see that this young woodland has a growing community of species that call it home.

 

in the woods

The following are just a few of the mammal and bird species we’ve seen so far. There have been many birds, some heard rather than seen, glimpses of deer, mice and voles, a weasel, signs that  badgers are about . In some cases, you don’t see the creature itself but  the tell tale signs of activity and then you can try to figure out what has happened.

Continue reading There is a growing community of species living in the woods

Frogs and newts are both using the pond this spring, so what will happen to the frog spawn?

After a cold end to March, it feels like spring is finally here – the weather has warmed, plants are growing again, birds are singing and amphibians like frogs, toads and newts are making their way to ponds for mating and egg laying.

frog_in-grass

On April 1, in the tiny pond at home, there was an overnight appearance of frog spawn, a big clump of it right in the middle of the pond. I didn’t see any frogs (Rana temporaria ), in the pond but movement under the water made the spawn wobble so something was down there. Maybe it was the frog who laid the spawn staying to protect the eggs for a while.

Continue reading Frogs and newts are both using the pond this spring, so what will happen to the frog spawn?

The bold robin has become bolder still

All images enlarge when clicked.

When I wrote about the robin previously, it was bold but not yet confident enough to take mealworms from the hand.

After we got the mealworms, we thought it would take a few days for the robin to work up the confidence to take them from an open hand, but we didn’t take into account that this bird was already bold – it had already spent a good deal of time watching from quite nearby when anyone has been working outside and would fly into the garage and perch somewhere if Karl was working in there. As it happened, it took just three and a half hours for the robin to pluck up the courage to land on an outstretched hand and grab its first worm. Since then, it will come down often and takes most of the mealworms held out for it.

miranda-robinHow could you resist that face?

Continue reading The bold robin has become bolder still

Flying ants and pizza

Being British, it’s been a bit warm for me, to be honest. That said, it means we’ve spent more time sitting in the garden and not just sitting, either, but cooking there as well. It was on Saturday that we lit the outside cob oven again and cooked pizza. That oven has been great this summer and it’s been worth the faff of building it for being able to oven-cook without heating the house up in the process and there’s also the added bonus of being able to show off now and then.

oven_1

Just by where we set up the table, there is an old tree stump in the lawn. It was there when we moved here in 2009 and we decided to leave it. Tree stumps are good habitats for beetle larvae, wood-boring wasps and whatnot and we saw no reason to dig it out. It gets tripped over now and then but not often.

Continue reading Flying ants and pizza