Tag Archives: lasius niger

Flying ant day 2015

If you saw mention in the news about swarms of flying ants during the the last week, then you may also have seen the ants themselves. Over the weekend between July 31 and August 2 there were a flurry of stories across all the media reporting sightings of the emergence of thousands of flying ants with Sunday August 2 being the peak ‘Flying Ant Day’. Here at home, in west Oxfordshire, Flying Ant Day was Friday July 31 at approximately 5.15pm. I was lucky enough to see two colonies emerge, with the larger young queens and smaller males to take to the air for their nuptial flight, guided from the nest by small wingless workers. Last year’s Flying Ant Day occurred on July 27 at 7pm and on that occasion it was yellow meadow ants (Lasius flavus) that were seen. They emerged from an old tree stump in the garden.

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The ants I saw this year were black ants, probably Lasius niger and the ant most likely to be seen in the UK. One emergence came from under the slabs in the courtyard. We had been aware of their presence because of sandy deposits in the gaps between the slabs and because of increased worker ant activity in the days leading up to the nuptial flight. The other emergence was in the garden, where it seems that they were under the walls of the building at the end of the garden. Seeing that white wall suddenly covered in winged ants was quite startling and took me back to the age of about seven, when I’d seen black ants crawling up a white wall at my childhood home. There were hundreds of them slowly making their way up to about 3m before taking off. Some fell off and had to start again, others took off and landed on my clothes before making another attempt at flight. You can see why people having picnics or barbecues might be annoyed by such a phenomenon but I was involved in neither and it was fascinating to watch.

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The weather conditions for both this year and last year’s emergence was the same – dry, warm, humid and with a light breeze. This allows the ants to take flight and mate without being blown away or rained on. So many ants flying at once means that they are so many that not all can be predated by birds and there will be enough queens to land, shed their wings and start a new colony. Only the queens survive the nuptial flight, the males die shortly after mating.

If you saw an ant colony emerge and would like to submit your records, you can do so on the website of the Royal Society of Biology, where you can also find out more about the UK’s ant species.